Thursday, April 11, 2013

Lock Smocks = Genius!

If your elementary school is like mine, your administration probably fortified your school and upped the security measures over the course of the school year.  We had new locks installed, added a buzzer, and we totally revamped our school plan and evacuation procedures.  I HOPE that (aside from the buzzer) we never have to use any of our plans, but they are in place nonetheless.  :)  So, I was really excited when I received an email from The Price of Teaching about a nifty little invention that she calls the "Lock Smock".


The Lock Smock has elastic bands that go around both doorknobs, and the fabric sort of hugs the door. It allows you to keep your door locked at all times without locking kiddos out of the room.  You can simply unhook it during a lockdown situation... so it seriously cuts back on having to go out into the hallway to lock the door with a key if you are in a really old building like I am.  Plus, they are super cute too!




The door you are looking at right now actually leads to my partner's classroom.  We have a little breezeway in between our two rooms, and this door is ALWAYS locked.  We don't have the key and because we don't want to continually pester the custodians, we have always had to make sure it was cracked open or my partner and our kiddos would have to go into the hallway and take the long way into my classroom.  Sometimes they would knock.  (Knocking kind of drives me crazy.  Ha!)  The Lock Smock has solved our little problem though, so I no longer have to worry about letting kids back into the room once they visit the Lost and Found.  I no longer have to remind them to prop it open when they pop into the other room for something.  It is an absolute lifesaver! :)  If you are interested in checking it out for yourself, they are available for $5.00.  Definitely worth it!  You can check them out at The Price of Teaching on Etsy!  :)  Have a great night, friends!  


26 comments:

  1. What a cool find! We have to keep our doors locked at our school, and its super annoying to hear that "knock, knock, knock" on the door 50 times a day! This would solve all my problems :)

    Natalie
    Teachery Tidbits

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  2. That is awesome! I have been putting a tiny magnet on my door frame so it won't shut all the way and lock kiddos out... I'll have to check this out for sure!

    :)
    Christina
    *Bunting, Books, and Bainbridge*

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  3. Hey! LOVE the blog post! Thanks so much for helping me spread these around!!!! I'm so glad to hear it is working well! :)

    Thanks!
    Bri
    The Price of Teaching

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    1. Hi Bri,
      We have the same locked door issues as the other schools posted here. However, for some reason, the rooms in my classroom pod area also have the added problem of being in some kind of wind tunnel. The door is either all the way open, or it has to be shut, and therefore, locked. If we try to just leave our doors open a little, they blow all the way open. Do you think the Lock Smock would work with a heavy classroom door + wind tunnel?
      Thanks,
      Rachel

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  4. I've seen these on Pinterest for a baby's room. I never thought about it for the classroom! I hate knocking doors :) so clever!!

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    1. They're similar but Lock Smocks are made much sturdier for that everyday classroom use and quite a bit bigger. I had a few people get them confused and purchase the other kinds but they wouldn't work on classrooms doors, they kept locking them out. Lock Smocks are designed for classroom doors and are reinforced so they wont lock you out. :)

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  5. I wish I could use this but because of our heightened security we have to keep the doors locked at all times and get in trouble if we don't. It is a pain but i know our school district means well!
    Rambling About Reading

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    1. The nice thing is that the door IS locked the whole time, so all you have to do is take the smock off quickly if you need to keep anyone out of your room. It's actually quick and easy to do! :) The door is locked... but the Lock Smock pushes the lock in to allow you to open and close it while the smock is on the door. :)

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  6. Very cute! You can also do what we do. We put a rectangular magnet like you get from insurance companies and put it over where the door would latch. If we have a lockdown I just pull the magnet and close the already locked door. It is super fast!

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    1. We tried those, but they kept falling off and locking us out... That is actually what helped me come up with Lock Smocks! :)

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  7. Lucky, our district won't allow us to use anything like that! :)

    Kelli

    Surviving the Little People

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  8. Would they work with doors that have a push-down door handle? I am hoping so! :)

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  9. I am so surprised to read that so many teachers are complaining about locking doors! I agree: very useful for the access doors to neighboring classrooms but every school has a weakness and keeping your entry doors locked (kids knocking) protects the children and the teacher in case someone gets around the school's security measures (like jumping a fence!?)
    We have used the little wireless buzzers in ours: you put he little piece in the doorway (outside) and plug the other piece into an outlet (power strip) and adjust the volume. During lockdown, we pull the outlet piece out of the wall (kept near our window cards and folders). The little buzzer beeps anytime someone steps near the door. If you place inside the door jamb, others can't set it off walking by...just a thought.

    But, thinking of ordering some of these for the shared access doors to our pod room though, the nursery version didn't hold up!

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  10. Love this. It sure beats my duct taping the strike plate everyday. I will be making one for each of my two schools and hope that they don't get "outlawed" too. Thanks for sharing this wonderful idea

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  11. Love this. It sure beats my duct taping the strike plate everyday. I will be making one for each of my two schools and hope that they don't get "outlawed" too. Thanks for sharing this wonderful idea

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  12. At first, I didn't quite get what a “lock smock” is until you explained its function. Well, it's good that you find this little invention truly helpful to you. But with faulty knobs and handles, I'd say fix them and get them working accordingly.
    Access Lock Technologies, Inc.

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  13. Lockdowns?

    Thankfully we don't have that kind of thing here in England!

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  14. This is an innovative idea, however, as a parent in this day & age, I hope none of my children's teachers are using this. In the unfortunate event that a gunman were to get in their school, I don't want their classroom door to be able to be opened. I'd much rather the teacher be inconvenienced by knocks than barged in by someone wanting to harm the children. Mine are 13 & 15 & I want their classroom doors always locked (unable to be opened) while they are in class.

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  15. Thanks for sharing this one. I'm sure that many of your readers would like to try it also on their homes.

    www.locksmithpalatine.net

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  16. Our doors have to remain locked all the time. I have a pass the students take with them and slide under the door to get back in. The leader of the day can then let them in without disrupting the whole class. No pass, only the teacher can then open the door. I have given passes to all the specialists that come to my room as well so they can be let in by the student leader. This is really working out well for a second grade classroom

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  17. So, this is mainly for teachers in old schools where there is no lock on the INSIDE of the door? I lock my long handle door from inside my room.
    Also, we aren't required here in my Georgia district (largest one) to lock our doors; so we rarely do and therefore kids come/go as they go to bathroom or library or an errand. It doesn't seem to me very beneficial as the door is always unlocked on the outside - the place you want locked in case of an intruder.

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  18. I would love to do something like this but my classroom is literally the first classroom in the building. Once when the kiddos were out of school, we did a simulated lockdown where a resource officer shot blanks, and in the time it would take me to get to the door, take that off, and pull the door closed, I would have been shot. Any suggestions to adapt something like this for quick release from inside the closed room?

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